Health & Fitness

Do you think the covid vaccine will have negative effects on people who get it?

Health & Fitness

Posted by: renee2786

2nd Feb 2021 07:04pm

Do you think with the roll out of covid vaccines nationally that there will be negative effects or consequences of doing so?

Comments 9

Madelaine31954568
Madelaine31954568
  • 7th Mar 2021 01:13pm

I would be happy to get the vaccine after I have had children. There is no and won’t be any testing on the impact on unborn children. Having already had a miscarriage it worries me and brings my thoughts to the effects of past pandemic vaccines on malformations and still births.

Dena31948125
Dena31948125
  • 3rd Mar 2021 10:08am

I don’t think the vaccine will have a negative effects. What scares people the most is that the governments are putting people under pressure to get it, knowing that its side effects are not known yet.

E!
E!
  • 4th Mar 2021 03:35pm
I don’t think the vaccine will have a negative effects. What scares people the most is that the governments are putting people under pressure to get it, knowing that its side effects are not known...

I think there's a risk of side effects of being vaccinated or taking any form of medications, but hopefully most people won't experience any of it! I do agree that the governments are really pushing it to the people even though they are not as extensively tested as other medical products in the market. It is up to the individual to decide whether to go for the vaccination, all I am saying is take it with your eyes wide open.

mustang6000
mustang6000
  • 16th Feb 2021 10:15am

No I don't. I believe that a lot of the doubt surrounding the vaccines has to do with the speed of development, testing and approval. We have to keep in mind that this was such an extraordinary need that labs put just about everything else on hold world wide to develop these and the testing & approval processes in a lot of countries were streamlined in view of the dangers posed by this virus. All in all, I would say that a lot of people did some absolutely fantastic work and need recognition. So, I will be getting my shot as soon as it is available here, with any doubts or concerns. I think any minor reactions will be worth the peace of mind, I also realise that we will probably have an annual shot for life.

ab
ab
  • 16th Feb 2021 01:26am

Renee2786, no I don’t think so. What's that based on? Hope, because hope in our scientists and world leaders is all I have. Only time will tell, if that hope was misplaced, if years from now, I along with millions of people over the world, suddenly find ourselves in grief, as a result of having had the vaccine.
Sadly, it seems this virus, like the common cold and influenza, is here to stay...returning with a new variant, to wipe out a few thousand people (like the flu does in Australia) every year.
I can understand the fear of negative effects that some people might feel about taking the vaccine, but if I were to hold that fear, what's my alternative? How long do I wait to be sure of zero negative effects, 7-10 years? Nope…I don’t think so.
I hope the consequences of taking the vaccine is that I can shake someone's hand again when I meet them, hug and kiss relatives as the occasion arises, and concern myself a little less about this new virus.

capfantastic
capfantastic
  • 15th Feb 2021 04:28pm

The worst effect would be that they do not provide immunity when exposed to either the initial SARS II virus or the other localised strains which are apparently more infectious. Also the so called “herd” immunity may not come to be. As with colds and flu, these viruses are passed around without the victim being able to become immune to a further infection. This would mean there is still a likelihood that we will become infected from a mutated strain even after vaccination has taken place. This is why social distancing and hygiene will remain important post jab(s).

capfantastic
capfantastic
  • 15th Feb 2021 04:27pm

The worst effect would be that they do not provide immunity when exposed to either the initial SARS II virus or the other localised strains which are apparently more infectious. Also the so called “herd” immunity may not come to be. As with colds and flu, these viruses are passed around without the victim being able to become immune to a further infection. This would mean there is still a likelihood that we will become infected from a mutated strain even after vaccination has taken place. This is why social distancing and hygiene will remain important post jab(s).

kidwithsmurf
kidwithsmurf
  • 6th Feb 2021 01:56pm

I think the covid vaccines will have negative effects or consequences. This is because every country is trying to be the first to have a working vaccine. This causes numerous issues with the vaccines as it has turned into a race to be first and have the most quantity when it should be about quality. If every country worked together to make one vaccine, gave it the required time to test it properly then we'd be better off. This whole race to be the first to have a vaccine is what is going to make the vaccine have negative effects and or long term consequences that are unforeseen at this early stage.

The vaccine needs more testing before I'd even decide on getting jabbed.

Gerry
Gerry
  • 4th Mar 2021 04:56pm
I think the covid vaccines will have negative effects or consequences. This is because every country is trying to be the first to have a working vaccine. This causes numerous issues with the...

Australia still has not injected hardly anyone so far.
Doses
10,168 used so far. It will take 5 years to vaccinate all.

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