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New year's resolutions

It is no coincidence that your local gym has been advertising discounted memberships. According to a study by finder.com.au, four out of five Australians set themselves a New Year’s resolution for 2020. Of these, more than half wanted to improve their fitness/lose weight.

Recently, we asked the Cafestudy community whether they made a New Year’s resolution for 2020 and if so, what were they and how were they tracking. The results varied, with some members having success and others having trouble committing to their New Year’s resolutions.

As expected, most resolutions revolved around creating healthier habits; such as quitting smoking, better eating habits, or more exercise.

"I have decided to use interval dieting as a way to lose the last 4 kg the doctor is asking me to lose. I feel changing what I have been doing for a while might kick-start this last little challenge. ”

"I am going to get fitter this year so that I don’t feel so tired. I have committed to walking for at least 30 mins 5 days a week and have done so since 1st January. ”

Not all Cafestudy members made a New Year’s resolution, with several members stating how they didn’t see the point in them.

“Knowing that just about every person who makes a New Years Resolution will break it within the first six days With this in mind, why even contemplate making a resolution that one will not keep anyway.”

“Nope. I don't make NY resolutions. I have learnt in the past that they are quickly and easily forgotten. Also, why only for the new year? Why not for the whole year? Why do people need something to happen to start setting goals? Just do it and get it over with.”

”My personal opinion is that New Year’s resolutions are just procrastination. If you know a change needs to be made, why wait? Do it now? I feel that if people think a change can wait until another date then they are not committed to it and are likely to fail.”

The new year represents a fresh start for many who may have had negative experiences and are longing for positive change. Although resolutions may not come to fruition, the biggest step is acknowledging the need for change and acting upon it.

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    Last reply: 24th Feb 2020 / 4 replies / Post by Anonymous

Member comments

raejoanne

Posted by: raejoanne
Posted: 22nd Feb 2020

raejoanne says: I have decided, there will be no more resolutions because they are too hard to stick to, however, I did promise the one thing I have been promising for the last 10 years and that is giving up smoking. Well I am on my eighth week of no smoking and not feel as though I even want to try one. It was just will power and the want in me that made me do it. Yay me!!!! lol Reply

Angieg

Posted by: Angieg
Posted: 24th Feb 2020

raejoanne says: I have decided, there will be no more resolutions because they are too hard to stick to, however, I did promise the one thing I have been promising for the last 10 years and that is giving up...

Angieg says: Well done for not giving in to the ciggies. It's amazing that some people find it so much easier than others. What are some of the most noticeable changes that you've noticed since quitting? I've been a smoker for decades and have tried many times to give up - I've more than halved my daily use though. Have tried cold turkey, patches, gum, lozenges and spray. Reply

Angieg

Posted by: Angieg
Posted: 24th Feb 2020

Angieg says: Just the phrase of "New Years Resolutions" makes me uncomfortable - it either puts pressure on people or like the above mentioned comment, makes people procrastinate their intended goals until the New Year. Reply

Angieg

Posted by: Angieg
Posted: 24th Feb 2020

Angieg says: Just the phrase of "New Years Resolutions" makes me uncomfortable - it either puts pressure on people or like the above mentioned comment, makes people procrastinate their intended goals until the New Year. Reply

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