Home & Garden

Mould Removal

Home & Garden

Posted by: lisa170

21st Jul 2011 12:36pm

Does anyone have any tips for permanent mould removal without using straight bleach? Our roof is leaking like a sieve and its keeping the ceilings very damp and given that we're renting there is only so much nagging we can do to get it fixed. Its impossible to sleep in the bedroom when you're breathing in bleach fumes.

Comments 14

shelly47
  • 16th Oct 2012 11:59am

Would any of these solutions work to kill the mold in the grout of the tiles in my shower? After trying a lot of things, some of which don't work and some do clean the tiles themselves but I can never get the grout properly clean and they look black and stained with mold! I have tried spraying with oil of cloves in a litre of water and left overnight. Then I scrubbed it all over with hot water and detergent, Tiles came clean but the grout is still mouldy and stained! Please help if you have the answer to the problem.

Lela
  • 11th Mar 2012 02:35pm

Paint your ceilings and put the mould stuff in the paint. Go up the man hole and place the stuff you can get from Bunnings-to stop your clothes from going mouldy- and place around the roof cavities. I did this years ago and it worked.

havalaugh
  • 25th Feb 2012 01:41am

There is a product I have used. After you have cleaned the mould with the best method suggested above, then paint with a solution called NOW I know it as. It comes in what looks like a paint tin & goes on just like paint. I bought it from a paint shop in melbourne after being recommended for a mouldy wall I had that was caused by a birds nest in my outside guttering & the water over flowing & running back into the house down my bedroom wall. This was suggested by a plasterer friend of mine as I didn't want to replace the wall. This will stop the mould coming through the wall or roof where ever you have it. Also there are mould buckets you can buy from bunnings which remove any excess moisture in the room, you will see these buckets fill with water from the moisture from the air in the room. These tips helped me with my dillema, hope this helps you. But take the advise of the other members about fixing the problem form the renting end of things, this should not be allowed so don't put up with it any longer from your landlord.

havalaugh
  • 25th Feb 2012 01:39am

There is a product I have used. After you have cleaned the mould with the best method suggested above, then paint with a solution called NOW I know it as. It comes in what looks like a paint tin & goes on just like paint. I bought it from a paint shop in melbourne after being recommended for a mouldy wall I had that was caused by a birds nest in my outside guttering & the water over flowing & running back into the house down my bedroom wall. This was suggested by a plasterer friend of mine as I didn't want to replace the wall. This will stop the mould coming through the wall or roof where ever you have it. Also there are mould buckets you can buy from bunnings which remove any excess moisture in the room, you will see these buckets fill with water from the moisture from the air in the room. These tips helped me with my dillema, hope this helps you. But take the advise of the other members about fixing the problem form the renting end of things, this should not be allowed so don't put up with it any longer from your landlord.

havalaugh
  • 25th Feb 2012 01:38am

There is a product I have used. After you have cleaned the mould with the best method suggested above, then paint with a solution called NOW I know it as. It comes in what looks like a paint tin & goes on just like paint. I bought it from a paint shop in melbourne after being recommended for a mouldy wall I had that was caused by a birds nest in my outside guttering & the water over flowing & running back into the house down my bedroom wall. This was suggested by a plasterer friend of mine as I didn't want to replace the wall. This will stop the mould coming through the wall or roof where ever you have it. Also there are mould buckets you can buy from bunnings which remove any excess moisture in the room, you will see these buckets fill with water from the moisture from the air in the room. These tips helped me with my dillema, hope this helps you. But take the advise of the other members about fixing the problem form the renting end of things, this should not be allowed so don't put up with it any longer from your landlord.

Anonymous
  • 21st Sep 2011 06:19pm

Good eveing, As you are renting I would suggest you firstly photograph all areas inwhich mould is present,date the photographs and Have two copies one for yourself and one for the owner{s} of the property.You then arrange for a suitable time to discuss this matter in having this hazard rectified by the owner{s} My occupation Painter/Home decorator,as mould is present you will find the problem may reoccur as the dampness is on the other side and spreads through once mould is there it is there, alternatively the owner may compensate while repairs are carried out. Alternatively exit moulding&rinsing with clean water/Sugar soaping entire areas thoroughly/2nd rinsing/drying/ventilation/pigmented sealer appplied left to dry and hardened and then ceiling paint applied. This is my View. Sorry about the bad news on the other hand this can be cured..If you have know luck with the owneres the other way you could have this matter resolved is to FILE a work order on your landlord obtainable from DEPT.BUILDING&HOUSING 0800 836262.This would sort the matter out. Kind regards Megan 027 8281853 TXT ok!!

mauvehaze
  • 20th Aug 2011 02:36pm

UNFORTUNATELY bleach cannot completely kill mold growing in porous materials. The chlorine in bleach cannot penetrate into porous surfaces such as drywall or wood. The chlorine is left on the surface of porous materials and only the water component of the bleach is absorbed into the material, providing more moisture for the mold to feed on.

Some of the mold on the surface might be killed but the roots of the mold are left intact meaning the mold soon returns, leaving you in a cycle of repeated bleaching. Perhaps this is why some people believe that spraying bleach on mold doesn't affect it but instead just bleaches its color so you can no longer see it.

Another disadvantage of bleach is that it can damage the materials it's used on as it is a harsh, corrosive chemical. Chlorine bleach also gives off harsh fumes and it even produces toxic gas when mixed with ammonia. There are safer alternatives such as borax or vinegar which don't produce dangerous fumes or leave behind toxic residue. For these reasons try to avoid using bleach and if you must use it, only use it on non-porous surfaces.
Borax
Does Borax Kill Mold?

There are many advantages to using borax to kill mold. For starters, borax is a natural cleaning product and although it is toxic if you swallow it, borax does not emit chemicals or dangerous fumes like some other mold killers. Borax, a white mineral powder, has a pH level of about 9 (baking soda is pH 8.1 and pH 7 is neutral) and a low toxicity.

Borax is commonly used as a deodorizer as well as for cleaning toilets and drains. Borax is also used as an insecticide, herbicide and fungicide and it can be mixed with water in a solution to kill and remove mold as it is a natural mold inhibitor. You can buy borax in supermarkets for a few dollars from the laundry section.
How to Kill Mold with Borax

To kill mold using borax, create a borax-water solution using a ratio of 1 cup of borax per gallon of water.
Vacuum up any loose mold with a HEPA filtered vacuum cleaner to lessen the number of spores stirred up into the air during the cleaning process.
Use a scrubbing brush with the borax-water solution to scrub the mold off the surface.
Wipe up any extra moisture and excess mold particles or dust/debris to prevent them spreading into the air once the surface has dried.
You don't need to rinse off the borax as the solution will prevent more mold beginning to grow on the surface again.
Leave the surface to dry completely.


Vinegar
Does Vinegar Kill Mold?

Vinegar is a mild acid which can kill 82% of mold species. However it also has the advantages of being natural and safe. Vinegar is non-toxic and doesn't give off dangerous fumes like bleach does.

Cleaning Mold with Vinegar

To kill mold with vinegar, use white distilled vinegar which you can buy cheaply from the supermarket.
Pour some vinegar into a spray bottle without watering it down.
Spray the vinegar onto the moldy surface and leave it to sit for an hour.
Wipe clean the area with water and allow the surface to dry. Any smell from the vinegar should clear within a few hours.


If you want to use vinegar to prevent mold growing on surfaces just spray vinegar on the surface and leave it. Repeat this every few days to ensure the surface will stay mold-free. You can even mop your tiled bathroom floor or other hard non-porous floors with vinegar if you are worried about mold growing on them.
Ammonia
Does Ammonia Kill Mold?

Like bleach, ammonia will kill mold on hard non-porous surfaces such as countertops, glass or tiles but it is ineffective at killing mold growing in porous material such as wood or drywall.

Another disadvantage of using ammonia is that it is a harsh, toxic chemical. Make sure you never mix ammonia with bleach because the gas they create when combined is toxic. Chlorine mixed with ammonia was even used as a chemical weapon during World War 2.

Additionally, although ammonia can kill surface mold, dead mold and dead mold spores are still allergenic so you will need to make sure to remove them afterwards.

How to Kill Mold with Ammonia

To kill mold using ammonia, create a solution of 50% clear ammonia and 50% water in a spray bottle and spray it on moldy areas.
Make sure the ammonia you use says "clear ammonia" on the label.
Leave the area for a few hours before wiping and rinsing.
Often detergents or mold cleaning products will contain ammonia. In that case just follow the directions on the label and be sure never to mix it with bleach.


Hydrogen Peroxide
Hydrogen Peroxide and Mold

Hydrogen peroxide kills mold as it is anti-fungal as well as anti-viral and anti-bacterial. Hydrogen peroxide is a good alternative to chlorine bleach because it is safe to use and doesn't damage the environment, nor does it leave behind toxic residue or produce toxic fumes like chlorine bleach does. You can buy hydrogen peroxide from drug stores for around one dollar for a bottle of 3% concentration.

Hydrogen peroxide kills mold effectively on many materials such as clothes, floors, bathroom fixtures, walls and items such as kitchen appliances. Since hydrogen peroxide is a bleaching agent it may also help fade the stain mold leaves behind. Spot test hydrogen peroxide on the material you're going to be cleaning to make sure it won't fade the material's colors.

How to Kill Mold with Hydrogen Peroxide

To kill mold pour 3% concentration hydrogen peroxide into a spray bottle.
Spray the moldy surface completely so that the moldy areas are saturated with hydrogen peroxide.
Leave the surface to sit for 10 minutes while the hydrogen peroxide kills the mold.
Then scrub the area to make sure to remove all the mold and mold stains.
Finally wipe the surface down to remove residual mold and spores.


You can also use vinegar with hydrogen peroxide during the cleaning to more effectively remove the mold. Afterwards store the spray bottle in a dark place since light diminishes hydrogen peroxide's effectiveness.
Detergent and Water
Removing Mold with Detergent and Water

A solution of detergent and warm water can be used to scrub surface mold off non-porous surfaces. Although detergent itself doesn't kill mold, if the mold is on non-porous materials then the solution doesn't need to kill it as long as you completely clean away all the mold on the surface.
Baking Soda
Killing Mold with Baking Soda

Baking soda is well known as a natural and safe household cleaner. But you can also use baking soda to kill mold in your home. Unlike other mold killers which contain harsh chemicals, baking soda is mild (pH of 8.1) and harmless to your family and any pets.

Besides killing mold, baking soda also deodorizes and so using it can get rid of the smell mold leaves in your home. Baking soda also absorbs moisture to help keep mold away.

Vinegar is often used along with baking soda when cleaning up a mold problem since vinegar kills different species of mold to baking soda.

How to Kill Mold with Baking Soda

Add one quarter of a tablespoon of baking soda to a spray bottle of water.
Shake the bottle to dissolve the baking soda into the water.
Spray the moldy area with the baking soda and water solution.
Then use a sponge or scrubbing brush to make sure to remove all the mold from the surface.
Once you've scrubbed away the mold rinse the surface with water to remove any residual mold on the surface.
Spray the area with the spray bottle again and let the surface dry. This will kill any left over mold and prevent the mold returning.


You can use a cloth instead of a spray bottle to clean mold with baking soda.
Soak a cloth in water and then add one quarter of a tablespoon of baking soda to it.
Use the cloth on the moldy area to remove the mold with the baking soda and water solution.

Tea Tree Oil
Killing Mold with Tea Tree Oil

Of all the natural mold killing solutions tea tree oil is the most effective. Although it is also expensive, a small amount of tea tree oil goes a long way in killing mold.

Tea tree oil is an essential oil which is harmless to people and pets. Tea tree oil is antifungal, capable of killing all types of molds. Tea tree oil is antibacterial as well.

You can buy tea tree oil for about $10 for a small bottle from most natural food stores. Make sure the tea tree oil you buy is derived from the Melaleuca Alternifolia, which is the technical name for tea tree, as not all brands always are.

How to Kill Mold with Tea Tree Oil

To kill mold using tea tree oil add water to a spray bottle, keeping in mind how many cups it takes to fill the bottle.
Next add tea tree oil at the ratio of 1 teaspoon per cup of water that went into the spray bottle.
Spray the solution on the moldy surface.
There is no need to rinse since leaving the tea tree oil on the surface will kill the mold and prevent it from returning.


An alternative to using a spray bottle is to use a rag or cloth with the tea tree oil solution to clean away mold.
First create a solution of tea tree oil and water in the ratio of 1 teaspoon per cup of water.
Use a cloth to apply the solution to the moldy surface and scrub the mold away.
Again, you do not need to rinse the surface afterwards.


Tea tree oil has a strong smell but it will go away after some time. You can keep and use the solution you have made for a long time afterwards as tea tree oil does not lose its potency quickly.

Grapefruit Seed Extract
Killing Mold with Grapefruit Seed Extract

Grapefruit seed extract is similar to tea tree oil in that it is an expensive but very effective natural mold killer. The advantage of grapefruit seed extract over tea tree oil however is that it has almost no odor. Like tea tree oil you can buy grape fruit seed extract from most health food stores.

Grapefruit seed extract kills mold naturally as the citric acid from the grapefruit attacks mold. Grapefruit seed extract also disinfects areas and deodorizes as well. Like tea tree oil, a small amount of grapefruit seed extract goes a long way in killing mold.

How to Kill Mold with Grapefruit Seed Extract

To kill mold with grapefruit seed extract create a solution of grapefruit seed extract and water in a spray bottle in the ratio of 10 drops of grapefruit seed extract per cup of water.
Shake the spray bottle to mix the solution thoroughly and then spray it onto the surface where mold is growing.
You do not need to rinse the solution away afterwards although you can use a cloth to wipe away the mold and solution after some minutes if you like. The longer grapefruit seed extract is in contact with mold the more it will cut through and kill the mold colony and prevent mold from returning.
Repeat if needed to more thoroughly remove mold from the surface.


The grapefruit seed extract solution in the spray bottle will remain potent for a long time and can be reused again and again as grapefruit seed extract has a long shelf life.

Viv
  • 20th Aug 2011 09:51am

if you have tired the landlord and he wont do anything, try another house. Contact the local housing agency and ask if thy can force the landlord to fix the roof. There are minmal housing standards and it may be your house doesn't meet them.


short term fix. Buy a dehumidifier. run it 24/7. yes the power cost will go up, but the warmth of the room will increase and the mould will reduce, and when you find a more reasonable house and landlord and move you can take the dehumidiifier with you. Check the online second hand sales for some cheap deals. i bought one 3 year ago for $30 on an online auction site, and it still goes well ( a little noisy but it works a treat)

Anonymous
  • 20th Aug 2011 07:41am

I got the same prob and was told to rub lemon juice over it or maybe the orange Mr Muscle then put it out in the sun. Haven't got there yet to try. Need motivation and sun!

Loopie
  • 18th Aug 2011 10:01pm

We have the same problem in our house. A mould killer can be made with a mixture of Tea Tree Oil about 2 tsp., Eucalyptus Oil about 1tsp, and Vinegar about 2 cups. The Vinegar kills about 80% of mould, and the Tea Tree Oil. is an anti fungal, and antiseptic.
You could try this mix, at least it is a cheaply made solution

DeNiro
  • 18th Aug 2011 02:48pm

Try any citric juice - lemon or lime are stronger than orange, I think.

matt
  • 18th Aug 2011 11:27am

If you can get up there, you'll be able to wash it off with a rag and warm soapy water, but its a bit back breaking.
Bleach is easier, as you can spray it on but as you say the fumes require you to well ventilate. Some commercial products may have less fumes.
A mould resistant paint will help to reduce regrowth, but again you have to paint the ceiling, which is more work.

lols
  • 18th Aug 2011 12:03am

If you visit your local Hardware or paint shop, they should have a product to remove and kill mould. I can't remember the name, but I used to sell in when I worked at BigW before I retired 4 years ago. I have used it myself, so it works . Regards Laurie.

dthought
  • 25th Jul 2011 11:32am

Hi Lisa

Dilute some clove oil into some water and use it as a spray on the mould. THat will help you. Bleach doesn't kill mould at all, it merely turns it white.

This from Shannon Lush, an expert on eco-cleaning.

Remove mould from hard surfaces
If you can, first clean the surfaces with a mixture of 4 litres of hot water, 1 tablespoon bicarb of soda and half a cup of vinegar.
Mix a quarter teaspoon of Oil of Cloves (no more) per litre of water, put it in a spray bottle, lightly mist on. Leave for 20 minutes and wipe off. Spray again and leave. It will take 24-48 hours for the mould spores to dry and drop off.

Remove mould from soft furnishings and items
Mix one kilo of uniodised salt into 9 litre bucket of water. Wash the affected surface, wait until the salt crust forms and brush off with a soft broom. Please take care that the salt does not end up in the garden.

Cleaning smell out of carpets
Use half the amount of soap recommended in the instructions for your steam cleaner plus add: half a cup each of of bi-carb soda, white vinegar and methylated spirits and two teaspoons each of eucalyptus oil and glycerine.
Steam clean your carpet as usual.


Most of the stuff she mentions is available from Bunnings or your local supermarket.

Simon

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