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Driving skills

OK who is with me on this one? In my opinion, the Government should make it compulsary for all new drivers to go through a Defensive Driving Course suplimented by the government prior to moving to the next stage of their licence process. With luck this should eliminate some stupid accidents occuring on our roads as of late.

Last reply: 25th Jan 2018 / 84 replies / Post by muckypaws

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kfactor

Posted by: kfactor
Posted: 4th Jun 2014

kfactor says: I agree absolutely!! The number of young people who are dying on our roads is unacceptable. Not only should they be made to go through Defensive driving courses, I feel those who flaunt the laws, texting, talking on phone, etc should go on ride alongs with the paramedics. That way they could see first hand that it is a privilege to hold a licence, not a right. Reply

Wyrd

Posted by: Wyrd
Posted: 4th Jun 2014

Wyrd says: A defensive driving course would be great for all drivers. For new drivers it should be compulsory as it would teach them about what their car can do and how to handle any car in a difficult situation. It may also help them to think quick in any situation on the road. Reply

mustang6000

Posted by: mustang6000
Posted: 5th Jun 2014

mustang6000 says: I totally agree, I believe that these type of awareness courses should be part of the school curriculum for yr 12s or mandatory for Learner Drivers. I would also add that young driving offenders should have to visit people who are in orthopedic wards due to driving accidents, it just might be the wake up call needed and save one young life. Reply

jjdrer

Posted by: jjdrer
Posted: 18th Jun 2014

mustang6000 says: I totally agree, I believe that these type of awareness courses should be part of the school curriculum for yr 12s or mandatory for Learner Drivers. I would also add that young driving offenders...

jjdrer says: It is a great idea but arrangements need to be made. You need to respect the privacy of patients and their families, especially in the early stages of their treatment. I experienced a situation where my now late very elderly Mother was rushed to a public hospital and after extensive tests I was told she had no chance of survival of acute renal failure and I made the heartbreaking decision for her to go into palliative care. Minutes later a Dr. with several medical students with him, talked about it in my and my Mother's hearing. I found it very distressing. It temporarily upset me so much I had to leave her room for a few minutes to compose myself. The Dr. is very lucky I didn't give him my thoughts on his unthoughtful actions. Reply

daisy

Posted by: daisy
Posted: 2nd Jul 2015

jjdrer says: It is a great idea but arrangements need to be made. You need to respect the privacy of patients and their families, especially in the early stages of their treatment. I experienced a situation...

daisy says: sorry to have read about your problems with your mum Ihope you was able to work it out with the doctor and best of luck Reply

jjdrer

Posted by: jjdrer
Posted: 2nd Jul 2015

daisy says: sorry to have read about your problems with your mum Ihope you was able to work it out with the doctor and best of luck

jjdrer says: No I never saw that "Dr" again. I moved her back to the nursing home and sadly she passed away a few days later.
I was tempted to report him as he could have been more discreet. I would probably have been told that I was reacting becuase of the distressing situation I was in. Fortunately my Mum was fairly deaf and didn't hear what he said. I hope his bed manner is better than that. Reply

jjdrer

Posted by: jjdrer
Posted: 2nd Jul 2015

daisy says: sorry to have read about your problems with your mum Ihope you was able to work it out with the doctor and best of luck

jjdrer says: I would also like to say thank you for your concern. I really appreciate it. Reply

daisy

Posted by: daisy
Posted: 3rd Jul 2015

jjdrer says: I would also like to say thank you for your concern. I really appreciate it.

daisy says: some hospitals and doctors dont care thou and they dont care who they hurt idont say all doctors but some of them have no respect your not the only one with amum not in this world mine isnt either so you arent alone Blossom Reply

nightcarer

Posted by: nightcarer
Posted: 5th Jun 2014

nightcarer says: I agree. Maybe they could make them do it when they transition from their red P's to their green?! I would love to do a DDC myself. I think I would enjoy driving more if I did it and if I knew other drivers had done it. Reply

jjdrer

Posted by: jjdrer
Posted: 8th Feb 2015

nightcarer says: I agree. Maybe they could make them do it when they transition from their red P's to their green?! I would love to do a DDC myself. I think I would enjoy driving more if I did it and if I knew...

jjdrer says: They don't only do it to accident victims, they do it to elderly people who have no hope of survivial. Reply

mishiee

Posted by: mishiee
Posted: 5th Jun 2014

mishiee says: Yes I agree most definitely. Years ago when my son was born, I was moving to Victoria and I did a lot of interstate driving. My husband suggested that I do a 'Defensive Driving Course' which I did do. Now this was in the early 1980's and I managed to get the course with none other than the late Peter Brock. Fantastic man and driver and I learnt so many things, it was amazing. This is most important for young people but I feel a great advantage for any one at any age. You learn so many different things, it's very good. Reply

lpullman

Posted by: lpullman
Posted: 5th Jun 2014

lpullman says: Absolutely, but so should anyone who hasn't completed one in, say, the last ten years. While it might make those of us who are getting on a bit feel better to have a go at the Youth of Today(tm), in my experience its the middle aged who mistake experience for ability who are a bigger issue* 'cause there's more of them.

But then I think you should have to spend a year on a motorcycle and be able to change a wheel safely before being given a license.

* Pet peave: BETWEEN the lines people, BETWEEN the lines Reply

peterv

Posted by: peterv
Posted: 19th Jun 2014

lpullman says: Absolutely, but so should anyone who hasn't completed one in, say, the last ten years. While it might make those of us who are getting on a bit feel better to have a go at the Youth of Today(tm),...

peterv says: Good point about a refresher course. Maybe it could entitle us older people to a dicount on insurance.

Okay I know I'm dreaming! Reply

Brad

Posted by: Brad
Posted: 4th Feb 2015

lpullman says: Absolutely, but so should anyone who hasn't completed one in, say, the last ten years. While it might make those of us who are getting on a bit feel better to have a go at the Youth of Today(tm),...

Brad says: Ipullman: "I think you should have to spend a year on a motorcycle and be able to change a wheel safely before being given a license."

I agree that a year on a motorcycle is excellent preparation for survival, but you lost me on the 'tyre changing' issue, IPM.

Do you mean changing a tyre on a bike, or car? In WA, we've recently had several deaths due to roadside tyre changes. The RAC can more safely assist drivers with this often difficult roadside procedure. Maybe RAC m/ship should be compulsory(?) Reply

None

Posted by: None
Posted: 4th Feb 2015

Brad says: Ipullman: "I think you should have to spend a year on a motorcycle and be able to change a wheel safely before being given a license."

I agree that a year on a motorcycle is excellent...

None says: I agree that having to spend time on a motorbike should be a part of the course, and from personal experience it has certainly helped me avoid accidents. Some motorists think they own the road, and some motorcyclists just don`t seem to think that cars and buses are bigger and harder than themselves! Reply

Brad

Posted by: Brad
Posted: 4th Feb 2015

None says: I agree that having to spend time on a motorbike should be a part of the course, and from personal experience it has certainly helped me avoid accidents. Some motorists think they own the road, and...

Brad says: One of the serious issues is that cars and buses _do_ know they're bigger and harder. I've been riding 44 years now... and often been looked straight-in-the-eye by a driver who knew my right-of-way was worthless; that in the event I exercised that right and proceeded ahead *I* would die.

Yet in SW WA we now have a recent edict which encourages police to stop ALL motorcyclists for... wait for it... simply riding a motorcycle. The rationale? Motorcyclists suffer more injuries and fatalities (that old 'bigger and harder' principle) and this is for our own good, our own safety. Can you imagine the fuss if our police decided to stop all drivers of white or silver cars, simply because they're involved in most accidents? (The fact that there are more of them on the road may reflect that 'bigger and harder' anomaly).

Discriminating needlessly against any group of road users, be they young or old, rich or poor, black or white, on two or three or four wheels, or on shanks pony, is a breach of good law... and must inevitably diminish respect for our police service. Reply

lpullman

Posted by: lpullman
Posted: 7th Feb 2015

Brad says: Ipullman: "I think you should have to spend a year on a motorcycle and be able to change a wheel safely before being given a license."

I agree that a year on a motorcycle is excellent...

lpullman says: Deaths due to roadside tyre changes: unless the tyre somehow caused the death, then that is evidence that people need to taught to change a wheel safely. Calling out the RAA (in SA) to change a wheel is not a viable solution even if you only drive in the city.

Its not a difficult procedure - its extremely simple but apparently a significant number of people don't know how to do it.

Now changing a bike wheel is rather more complex, especially if you are miles from anywhere and have to repair a puncture. Been there, done that, got the broken nails to prove it :-) Reply

Brad

Posted by: Brad
Posted: 7th Feb 2015

lpullman says: Deaths due to roadside tyre changes: unless the tyre somehow caused the death, then that is evidence that people need to taught to change a wheel safely. Calling out the RAA (in SA) to change a...

Brad says: Ipullman: "Calling out the RAA (in SA) to change a wheel is not a viable solution even if you only drive in the city..."

Why not? In WA, the RAC (apparently WA's most respected service organisation) does this regularly, for members. Most folk I know (my wife and sons included) do know how to change a tyre. I'd rather my wife stayed in her car on the freeway... and called emergency help. So many Aussies are killed annually, changing a tyre by the roadside, unseen by the driver of the car or truck that kills them.

If one believes changing a car's tyre to be a skill assessed for a driver's licence, then it should also follow that drivers should be required to carry large reflecting warning triangles, to be erected a hundred metres and fifty metres behind the vehicle. Drivers should also be required to carry a torch and a reflective vest as part of their equipment, if this skill is to be included in licensing requirements.

Sounds a little silly, doesn't it? Why not simply pay for roadside assistance, let an expert do the job... and protect our loved ones?


Reply

jjdrer

Posted by: jjdrer
Posted: 7th Feb 2015

Brad says: Ipullman: "I think you should have to spend a year on a motorcycle and be able to change a wheel safely before being given a license."

I agree that a year on a motorcycle is excellent...

jjdrer says: Brad, I see where you are coming from Motor Bikes do not carry spare tyres.
Maybe it is dangerous to change tyres at the side of the road but if you puncture one and you are in a black spot with no mobile phone reception which often you cannot call for help. Others do not stop to get details to get help. RAC don't know to patrol roads just to look for incidents or do the other services interstate. How long can a driver control a car if it is a front tyre, especially the driver's side.?? Reply

Brad

Posted by: Brad
Posted: 7th Feb 2015

jjdrer says: Brad, I see where you are coming from Motor Bikes do not carry spare tyres.
Maybe it is dangerous to change tyres at the side of the road but if you puncture one and you are in a black spot...

Brad says: Thanks for your comments, Blossom.

My advice to my wife has been to: a.) always carry a mobile phone (we have four... and no home reception. See my comments re. inadequate cell phone reception, elsewhere :) 2.) If a tyre fails at night, pull as far off the road as is safe; 3.) Activate emergency flashers; 4.) Attempt to call me... or the RAC; 5.) Await an emergency road crew, the RAC, or the police. All will investigate a car with emergency lights flashing.

It's worth remembering that 80% of tyre failures may occur during the last 20% of tyre life. I don't know where that stat comes from, nor do I know its veracity, but I've bought new tyres before they reached the 20%-left stage, driving and riding across several continents... and through numerous countries. That 80/20 rule has saved us both a great deal of trauma during our extended travels! Reply

jjdrer

Posted by: jjdrer
Posted: 8th Feb 2015

Brad says: Thanks for your comments, Blossom.

My advice to my wife has been to: a.) always carry a mobile phone (we have four... and no home reception. See my comments re. inadequate cell phone...

jjdrer says: Sorry but that is not always the case.. Nobody stopped we were parked off the side of the road. We had to resort to locking our car up and walking to a farmhouse a few km away that we had passed to get them to ring for help for us.
Unfortunately not all tyres are worn when they fail
In an very unusual case during my Mum and i were with my brother waiting for the lights to go green waiting to turn right when his right front tyre let go. We heard it "pop". It was a brand new tyre having only been fitted about 20 minutes. He literally crawled around the corner and parked at the kerb as soon as he could., luckily near another branch of the tyre company. It was down on the rim by that time. Fortunately he knew the salesperon at the branch he had it fitted at so they agreed to replace it via stock transfer, have it tested and him pay for it was his fault. There was no scuff marks on it. It was a faulty tyre.
.A friend of ours have a tyre swell up like a balloon. The lady called the RAA and the tyre was changed. As the lady had the receipt with her and the tyre was only a fortnight old she was given a note by the giuy who changed it for her. The car was only driven about 20km a fortnight to do the shopping. Her husband was paid fortnightly. It took quite a long discussion before they agreed to change the tyre or give her a refund. It nearly became a Govt. dept report to get justice for the customer. Needless to say they never bought that brand of tyre again. Reply

jjdrer

Posted by: jjdrer
Posted: 8th Feb 2015

jjdrer says: Sorry but that is not always the case.. Nobody stopped we were parked off the side of the road. We had to resort to locking our car up and walking to a farmhouse a few km away that we had passed...

jjdrer says: Not all areas have mobile phone receeption. Even between Reynella and just a few km north of O'Halloran Hill
(2 southern suburbs within 10km of each other has a black spot where there is no reception at all) Reply

Brad

Posted by: Brad
Posted: 8th Feb 2015

jjdrer says: Not all areas have mobile phone receeption. Even between Reynella and just a few km north of O'Halloran Hill
(2 southern suburbs within 10km of each other has a black spot where there is no...

Brad says: Good grief! I've never experienced any of those dramas you've described, during 50+ years of driving, Blossom. We always buy high-quality tyres and haven't had any suffer the fate you've described. I did experience a flat (scissors impaled in rear RHS tyre) a few years ago, but though I scolded the tyre severely, it was unrepentant.

Cell phone coverage is an issue. In the future, I guess a sat phone will be cheap and affordable... and those of us who live rurally will buy one.

So I guess you agree with IPM, then? Driver licensing should include demonstrating that one can indeed change a tyre? I just wonder how the partially-disabled and elderly might cope with that.... . Meanwhile, I'm happy to continue to change tyres myself, counsel my wife to call me or the RAC if caught after dark... and teach my grandkids how to change a tyre, change the oil and oil filter, clean an air filter, etc. Oh... and get maximum value from RACWA for the $279 we pay them annually!~ :) Reply

jjdrer

Posted by: jjdrer
Posted: 8th Feb 2015

Brad says: Good grief! I've never experienced any of those dramas you've described, during 50+ years of driving, Blossom. We always buy high-quality tyres and haven't had any suffer the fate you've...

jjdrer says: My brother's were Bridgestone and were their expensive ones(and brand new). They weren't cheapies. He is a motor mechanic and also has RAA of SA Cover. You don't expect them to pop within a few km. They hadn't even had time to warm up properly, let alone get hot. As he did some country running he had a good quality CB Radio in his car. There were some cheap ones but he wouldn't take the risk of it not being able to pick up signals long distance. It was before Mobile Phones came to Aust.
He and our friend are very safety conscious and that always comes before cost.
Our friend bought Olympic tyres and they weren't cheap ones either.
When my Mum and I bought a brand new (not second hand) car in 1984 my brother was with us when we chose it as went to the dealer he was working for. We chose one that had just arrived from the manufacturer. My brother took one look at the tyres on it. He looked at Mum and the Dealer and said "Mum you don't want those tyres". They were good tyres but weren't suitable for normal use. He decided they weren't as good as the ones of the car next to it and he didn't like that type of tread either. They knew he would not back down, neither would Mum.
He checked they had changed the wheels over before they called to say it was ready for collection. Safety wise he takes no chances. My now late Mum also had Top RAA cover (not the cheap version) Our now late Dad never did either. He was also a Motor Mechanic and tyre conditions were checked regularly between servicing as were the brakes in case new top brand parts had a fault in them. The exhaust pipe and box were also checked. Fluids were checked once a fortnight.
Bear in mind that apart from fortnightly shopping the car didn't do a big km as all our relatives and friends only lived a few km away. Mum worked it out that we did a detour and visited two households of relatives when we did the shopping. They lived in adjoining streets so the car was left at one house and we walked to the other unless it was raining, not just "spotting". The first set of tyres on Mum's car still had a lot of tread left on them when my brother suddenly realised how old they were so we bought new good quality Bridgetone tyres. They were professionally fitted and we always had a front wheel alignment done. before the car went back on the road. That is where some people take short cuts. Reply

jjdrer

Posted by: jjdrer
Posted: 8th Feb 2015

jjdrer says: My brother's were Bridgestone and were their expensive ones(and brand new). They weren't cheapies. He is a motor mechanic and also has RAA of SA Cover. You don't expect them to pop within a few km....

jjdrer says: We were also told about torches that had a switch on them that activated orange an orange flashing light that could be put on the car on sat one the road. We had one in each car and made sure the batteries were changed at least annully even if it wasn't used at all. The were kept in small open boxes so the switches couldn't accidently be knocked on at all. Reply

Brad

Posted by: Brad
Posted: 8th Feb 2015

jjdrer says: My brother's were Bridgestone and were their expensive ones(and brand new). They weren't cheapies. He is a motor mechanic and also has RAA of SA Cover. You don't expect them to pop within a few km....

Brad says: With so many mechanics in the family you're probably more qualified to comment on these matters than I am, Blossom!~

My query to IPM was in regard to his statement that we should all:
"...be able to change a wheel safely before being given a license..."

Because I'm concerned we're already over-regulated, I disagreed. I'd also disagree that we need to be able to repair an engine, by the side of the road, before being granted a licence. Both a flat tyre and a blown radiator will stop a car. What other mechanical skills might be necessary in this brave new world, before we can be licensed, I wonder? Headlight failure would be dangerous, of course, so maybe we need to demonstrate some auto-electrical skills...?

As I inferred earlier, contacting specialists to assist us at the roadside isn't a sin. Discrimination against some road users may well be!~ :) Reply

peterv

Posted by: peterv
Posted: 8th Jun 2014

peterv says: I'm with you 100% on this. I did a course many years ago and it's served me well.i've had a few near misses due to other drivers but have been able to avoid any accidents. It should be compulsory for all new drivers. Reply

jjdrer

Posted by: jjdrer
Posted: 18th Jun 2014

peterv says: I'm with you 100% on this. I did a course many years ago and it's served me well.i've had a few near misses due to other drivers but have been able to avoid any accidents. It should be compulsory...

jjdrer says: No way! Bikes have much narrower tyres therefore less traction. They are not alike to handle. On a wet slippery road if you ride on a painted line you slip even more.
A little bit of oil on the road doesn't show at all when the road is wet. On a bike you may be wearing a helmet which hopeful will prevent head injuries, but that is not always the case, especially if you slide into a guard rail or tree. I know a voluntary Paramedic who had the misfortune to attend am motorbike accident. When the rider's helmet was removed, the patient's head was split open. I won't say any more it is too gory. Reply

lpullman

Posted by: lpullman
Posted: 7th Feb 2015

jjdrer says: No way! Bikes have much narrower tyres therefore less traction. They are not alike to handle. On a wet slippery road if you ride on a painted line you slip even more.
A little bit of oil on the...

lpullman says: Sorry Blossom, but the narrow tyres thing just nonsense.

Your story about the motorcycle accident is an urban myth. It didn't happen. Reply

jjdrer

Posted by: jjdrer
Posted: 7th Feb 2015

lpullman says: Sorry Blossom, but the narrow tyres thing just nonsense.

Your story about the motorcycle accident is an urban myth. It didn't happen.

jjdrer says: Yes It did it was on Gorge Road near Athelstone, a suburb of Adelaide less than 2 minutes drive where the paramedic lives, That section of road is narrow, windy that the tree trunks are very close to the road edge. It happened prior to 1982. Why do motor bikes tend to not ride where motor oil may have dripped on the road???.
I witnessed a Police Officer ride on a slippery patch of road and almost fall off. The white paint on the road is slippery when wet - unless they have used their brains and are now using a different type.
IPullman -Do NOT accuse me of lying. That is an insult. What are you? A Police Officer who investigates accidents every day. Have you rescued people who have crashed into crash barriers or huge trees? I know a very recovery team driver who has done just that. He also has a First Aid Certificate and has administered treatment while waiting for an Ambulance to arrive. On another occcasion he went to the aid of a driver who ran off the road on Port Wakefiled Road near Two Wells north of Adelaide CBD. Reply

susim

Posted by: susim
Posted: 11th Jun 2014

susim says: YES!!! Reply

jjdrer

Posted by: jjdrer
Posted: 18th Jun 2014

jjdrer says: I agree that the courses are a good idea. A relative of mine with a very professional company did one using his own car and they discovered a problem with the hand brake.
Drivers should also be given the opportunity to have a ride in a vehicle that is high of the road. It is an eye-opener observing what is happening ahead of you. You can think about what action you would take to avoid an accident. Be warned, you see some very close shaves. How there isn't more accidents amazes me.
I also think drivers should be made aware of road traffic act law changes. Reply

jjdrer

Posted by: jjdrer
Posted: 8th Sep 2014

jjdrer says: I agree that the courses are a good idea. A relative of mine with a very professional company did one using his own car and they discovered a problem with the hand brake.
Drivers should also be...

jjdrer says: On some sections of the SE Freeway in SA, heading towards Adelaide the speed limit was reduced recently.
It was widely advertised for 2 - 3 weeks. The week before it came into force the media was flooded with reminders. It was in the Advertiser every day, in the Sunday Mail. on the TV news constantly. Motorists protested when they started getting fines on the 1st and 2nd day. Apparently there was plenty of Police presence including Motorcycle Police. A friend of ours drives a truck and at one point was down to 38 - 40 kph instead of constantly using his brakes and overheating them. He had the "last laugh" as he suddenly discovered he had a total of 3 Police Bikes beside and behind him. They appeared to be watching him and checking the speedo on their bikes. He slows down early by going down to lower gears. There has been some drivers interviewed who live in a country town who said that they reduce to about the same speed for the same reason. One section of the road is a very steep descent and it is very easy to gain speed. Trucks now are allowed 60kph and cars are allowed 90kph. The truckies interviewed stated that 60kpm is too fast in some sections because you need to be able to stop quickly if the lights change at the bottom of the descent. Reply

annezane

Posted by: annezane
Posted: 19th Jun 2014

annezane says: Totally and every 5 years we should all have to be retested that way they would get alot of idiots of the road lol Reply

lefroy

Posted by: lefroy
Posted: 20th Jun 2014

lefroy says: yes i do agree but to have a look on the other side of the coin,someone i knew made his son do this course and i think it was one the worse things he could have done as he became a shocking show off and in the end writ off his car,my point to all this you can teach the young all you want on how to drive on the roads but its the arrogance that most of the younger drivers have that will and does need changing. Reply

tibi

Posted by: tibi
Posted: 29th Aug 2014

tibi says: Fully agree defensive or advance driving course should be part of licence process, I didn't let my daugher loose on the public road till I was happy with her driving.I have driven in car rally and regular club racing over the years.My daugher now is 34 years old driving since she was 18,has a clean driving record and with out accident Reply

jjdrer

Posted by: jjdrer
Posted: 8th Sep 2014

tibi says: Fully agree defensive or advance driving course should be part of licence process, I didn't let my daugher loose on the public road till I was happy with her driving.I have driven in car rally and...

jjdrer says: A relative of mine has done circuit racing at AIR, rallycross at Tailem Bend, Collingrove Hillclimb
Also is now a volunteer at Mallala, Collingrove Hillclimb, SDCC and has done some classic rallies. Are you from SA?? Reply

tibi

Posted by: tibi
Posted: 8th Sep 2014

jjdrer says: A relative of mine has done circuit racing at AIR, rallycross at Tailem Bend, Collingrove Hillclimb
Also is now a volunteer at Mallala, Collingrove Hillclimb, SDCC and has done some classic...

tibi says: Hi Blossom, I am hard cor Victorian always lived in MELBOURNE or the MORNINGTON PENINSULA and I could not think a better place to live Reply

jjdrer

Posted by: jjdrer
Posted: 7th Feb 2015

tibi says: Hi Blossom, I am hard cor Victorian always lived in MELBOURNE or the MORNINGTON PENINSULA and I could not think a better place to live

jjdrer says: Yes, I agree with you as far as Mornington Peninsula is concerned. Having travelled in that area on a few occasions I know how slippery those roads can be in very wet conditions, including those in hilly areas. There are some in the area near Blairgowrie which have chicanes to slow the traffic down.
Reply

lmewburn

Posted by: lmewburn
Posted: 4th Feb 2015

tibi says: Fully agree defensive or advance driving course should be part of licence process, I didn't let my daugher loose on the public road till I was happy with her driving.I have driven in car rally and...

lmewburn says: In total agreement. I worked for a company back in the 80's and they put all company car drivers through an advanced and defensive driving course which was undertaken at GMH's Lang Lang proving ground this was the best thing they ever did and it certainly showed the very confident younger drivers that in fact they were nowhere near as skilful behind the wheel as they thought they were. The companies accident claims fell sharply after this training and why it is not compulsory for all new drivers is beyond me, because from where I sit as a driver covering 50-60,000k per year the current scheme of parents teaching their children how to drive is a complete failure as I have lost count of the times I see L plate drivers sitting in right hand lanes on motorways, exceeding the posted speed limits, driving straight through stop signs all because that is what Mum & Dad do these days and a high percentage of these learners have Mum or Dad beside either talking on the phone or head down texting a great example and we wonder why the young drivers are doing the same, sorry but bad habits are witnessed most of the time and Parents really need to set a good example Reply

welcome_0501

Posted by: welcome_0501
Posted: 17th Sep 2014

welcome_0501 says: i think this would certialyu benefit the community as a whole. can be fundd by tax payment, or work like the private health insurance, if u pay for the cours,e u pay less tax ---> give the incentive for people to do this course Reply

kit

Posted by: kit
Posted: 6th Nov 2014

kit says: I agree, if they can keep the costs to a minimum. When I did my Goulburn Valley Course, I was one of the early ones and to this day still believe it is great. It is bad enough that most under 25 have no idea how to control a car properly. In fact dare I say they cannot even reverse park, 3point turn, indicate properly, or understand many of the rules they are supposed to know. I taught driving for over 27 years, through 4 states and I would never allow a student to get behind the wheel until they displayed full verbal knowledge of the specific rules, could change a wheel without help, knew how to check the car fully -brakes, water, windscreen wiper/washer, radiator, seat belt quality, windows and mirrors clean, and tyres at appropriate pressure before even getting behind the wheel. I even taught my own children what they needed to carry in their cars as necessity for emergency. It has paid dividends too. Never had a pupil fail a test; my children never had an accident; and they now teach their own the same way.
However, I feel that drivers who are injured, have ill health, have serious accidents, or after specific age should have to attend a doctor for medical certificate to say they are ok to drive, and have eye tests as standard procedure and present these at their trnasport/main roads/RTA for final approval. A friend is now epileptic, still having seizures after accident 15 months ago, yet still allowed to drive. Yes, they have had seizures while driving resulting in accidents, albeit minor, Police called, nothing happened. Health is a single factor which must be adhered to for driving at all times. Reply

jjdrer

Posted by: jjdrer
Posted: 7th Feb 2015

kit says: I agree, if they can keep the costs to a minimum. When I did my Goulburn Valley Course, I was one of the early ones and to this day still believe it is great. It is bad enough that most under 25...

jjdrer says: How true ! I don't like the side mirrors on the new cars. You can't adjust them at all.
Certainly not in the 2013 built Holden Barinas. The mirror itself is fixed, no movement at all. The whole thing will fold inwards so you can walk past it without the risk of damage if you bump it as you are waiting past. You don't just have a blind spot because of the car structure - not such a problem in old cars, you have the problem of non adjustalbe exterior mirrors.. Reply

weerobby

Posted by: weerobby
Posted: 4th Feb 2015

weerobby says: Totally agree and the first ones thru should be government drivers both federal and state. One sees 18 yr old kids driving 4 litre 4wds and they don't know what the hell they are doing, can't park 'em and definitely can't reverse them ! Reply

Beachluva

Posted by: Beachluva
Posted: 4th Feb 2015

Beachluva says: Totally agree. Reply

jester123

Posted by: jester123
Posted: 4th Feb 2015

jester123 says: Stupid accidents are caused by people using mobile phones and inattention, not to mention speeding. I see young 'P' platers doing it all the time. They thing they're indestructible. Driving on the roads is starting to scare me. Reply

oscarpoi1

Posted by: oscarpoi1
Posted: 4th Feb 2015

oscarpoi1 says: Yes all people should have defensive driving training when I say all people I mean all drivers people who havn't had one should be required to comply when licence renewal is required. Reply

skiman

Posted by: skiman
Posted: 4th Feb 2015

skiman says: YES!!!!!!!!!!!! Reply

alicat

Posted by: alicat
Posted: 4th Feb 2015

alicat says: i think definitely the government should support this, their would be less accidents and the govvernment would save money as they end up paying for it in hospital care anyway. Reply

sauerkraut

Posted by: sauerkraut
Posted: 4th Feb 2015

sauerkraut says: with you all the way Reply

Bandit4165

Posted by: Bandit4165
Posted: 4th Feb 2015

Bandit4165 says: I definitely agree with this one. The govt. will have to sponsor the driving course as a lot of families would not be in the position to be able to afford this as the cost of the normal mandatory driving course tuition is quite expensive on its own. The costs would end up paying for themselves with less accidents and fewer young drivers getting killed or maimed. Reply

Ziah

Posted by: Ziah
Posted: 4th Feb 2015

Ziah says: I don't think it would make the blindest bit of difference. I firmly believe that people have to leave the planet somehow, and some have made the bargain to leave via motor vehicle accident (whether driver, passenger, innocent bystander, other vehicle driver/passenger etc). Regardless of any initiatives designed to reduce the road toll, it has continued to rise in direct proportion to the rise in population - and will continue to do so as the population increases. Even single-vehicle, single occupant versus tree/wall/truck accidents have their own name - vehicular suicide - and nothing anyone can do will prevent them from happening. And if you manage to prevent all vehicular accidents, these souls will simply find another way off the planet - you cannot prevent that from happening, and you simply cannot stop all people from dying. And before anyone says "but it's different when it's a family member who died/was killed" - I've lost family and close friends to motor vehicle accidents - one to vehicular suicide - and it has simply reinforced my belief that if someone is determined to die, there's nothing anyone can do to stop them - and no amount of making Defensive Driving courses compulsory will change that. Reply

Debbiem

Posted by: Debbiem
Posted: 5th Feb 2015

Debbiem says: Funded yes, Not compulsory, I dont think it would make much difference. Kids already have to jump through hoops to get their licence. ( I have a 16 and a 19 year old). They have to know all the road rules and drive perfectly to get their P's. Then they get out there unsupervised and have to deal with all the idiots on the road who dont know the road rules, dont use indicators, dont give way properly, and shouldnt hold a flamin' licence. If you dont want P platers driving badly its about time we started setting a better example.

The whole system is screwed and needs a major overhaul.

4 points per year and 5 year testing for everyone, would be a good start towards cleaning up the roads. Ive lost count of how many people Ive heard of who are now s**t scared they're going to lose their licence because they have 1 or 2 points left to last them for anywhere between 12 months and 2 1/2 years.

Driving schools what they teach and how they teach it needs to be looked at too.
Being taught how to operate a car and follow road rules is not enough, but kids shouldnt have to do a DD course to be taught simple safe driving techniques. Things like brake before the corner not through it, if you lose traction accelerate dont brake, and to be aware of surroundings at all times to allow for evasive action should all be part of basic driving training.
Treat the problem, bad drivers already on the roads settinga bad example, rather than just putting another bandaid on the symptoms. Reply

jjdrer

Posted by: jjdrer
Posted: 7th Feb 2015

Debbiem says: Funded yes, Not compulsory, I dont think it would make much difference. Kids already have to jump through hoops to get their licence. ( I have a 16 and a 19 year old). They have to know all the...

jjdrer says: Maybe the SA Police should keep an eye on a few careless Driving School Instructors too. The majority of them are very responsible and set a good example. Before I moved to a different suburb I quite regularly saw one who often didn't indicate when going around corners at all, didn't give way at T-Junctions. and drove through red lights when there wansn't muc traffic around. It is a one man driving school, not a company. SA Police have trouble keeping up with the latest Road Traffic Act because there are so many changes at times. Some come under the Local Govt. Act yet they are State Rules. Reply

frannymanny

Posted by: frannymanny
Posted: 5th Feb 2015

frannymanny says: Yes I am horrified by the numbers of young drivers killing and maiming themselves on the road.Any further practical driver education has to be a good thing. I do think however that a young person who just KNOWS that he is a fantastic driver , not to mention 12 foot tall and bullet proof , will not be deterred by someone telling him what to do Reply

Luvmydogs

Posted by: Luvmydogs
Posted: 5th Feb 2015

Luvmydogs says: Totally agree with you! I did one of these defensive driving courses when working for a federal government department years ago as we were often out on the road, driving all around the state, & I've found it so good. Reply

jjdrer

Posted by: jjdrer
Posted: 7th Feb 2015

jjdrer says: It is a great idea. The thing that concerns me is that the young ones will think they will
be able to avoid an accident regardless of the circumstances or road conditions. Reply

ozycash

Posted by: ozycash
Posted: 8th Feb 2015

ozycash says: stupid idea. the driving test is made so any idiot can get a licence. just make the driving test better so idiots dont get a licence in the first place! Reply

Freedomy

Posted by: Freedomy
Posted: 8th Feb 2015

Freedomy says: I have always wondered why they did not do this years ago. One it is a cash making avenue (government are so good at those), secondly these course are costly but vital to survival. And it may make one young restless mind, more responsible on the roads.

It is a win win situation. And while people may groan about cost, if you want your licence you will find away. Reply

Mickey

Posted by: Mickey
Posted: 10th Feb 2015

Mickey says: I quite agree with you young drivers need to go through a Defensive Driving Course. There are too many young drivers who think that they can drive but have know idea how to handle a car in different situations. They lack experience.
Reply

peterv

Posted by: peterv
Posted: 17th Apr 2015

peterv says: I completely agree. I did a defensive driving course many years ago and the lessons I learned still stand me in good stead today. I have the attitude that if you think everyone is out to kill you on the road then you'll probably survive!!! Reply

s

Posted by: s
Posted: 18th Apr 2015

s says: I agree, as being a person without a license I usually walk or use public transport 95% of the time I am not in a car.
Therefore I see a lot of drivers who need extra experience and knowledge and patience to become better safer drivers. Reply

dunbaylass

Posted by: dunbaylass
Posted: 19th Apr 2015

dunbaylass says: Yes I am with you, and I also think that vehicles for new drivers should be graded like they do with motor bikes, How many young kids do you see on the road with high power cars, SUVs, 4x4, and as my husband puts it , " They are hardly out of nappies", They govern trucks, why can't they do the same with young peoples cars,
Reply

Burnt Out Digger

Posted by: Burnt Out Digger
Posted: 26th Apr 2015

Burnt Out Digger says: I agree. By increasing the skill levels of drivers the number of accidents should be reduced thereby making road use much safer. Reply

silverwolf

Posted by: silverwolf
Posted: 5th May 2015

silverwolf says: Yes the best idea was when restrictions on powerful vehicles were denied to young drivers. I grew up when we lost whole generations of youth because of high powered cars and bikes. Most at the time could not handle the massive power outputs at the time. Japanese bike were legendary killers. We even had names for the real bad ones. Hiroshima screamers covered the genre of all models. But special mention goes to the kawasaki two stroke triples they were all named the widow makers of the time. Deadly. Biggest surprise is i am here to tell the tale Reply

Teka

Posted by: Teka
Posted: 15th Jun 2015

Teka says: I agree about Defensive Driving Course for new drivers but this course should be also compulsive for people coming from overseas to drive in our roads. An international driver license is not good enough. They don't know the local rules and make chaos in the traffic. Reply

En

Posted by: En
Posted: 27th Jul 2015

En says: Excellent suggestion. I would extend it to include all drivers every ten years Reply

CAT17

Posted by: CAT17
Posted: 15th Aug 2015

CAT17 says: I think all young drivers should take the test and not be allowed to drive powerful cars until they have at least a couple of years driving experience. Too many young ones are dying (well killing themselves) in high powered cars that 'get out of control'. Of course it is not the car out of control it is the driver who is inexperienced and cannot control the car.
Maybe driving lessons should be a compulsory part of the High School Certificate.
Reply

RichN

Posted by: RichN
Posted: 22nd Aug 2015

RichN says: Fully support this. Also agree that all drivers should have some compulsory retraining throughout their driving life. In all other parts of life qualiications have to be renewed and maintained, yet for driving a safety critical activity we just repurchase our licenses without verification of our up to date skills. Reply

rit

Posted by: rit
Posted: 16th Sep 2015

rit says: I agree Reply

mustang6000

Posted by: mustang6000
Posted: 29th Sep 2015

mustang6000 says: I totally agree, but would add that I would want this as part f a Yr 12 driving course that was a prelude to students getting their P's. A course of this nature would be more beneficial and add real life skills to their academic achievements. It could be an elective and take the place of some subjects that have little or no relevance once they graduate. Reply

dollymay

Posted by: dollymay
Posted: 27th Oct 2015

dollymay says: There will still b accidents whether they do a defensive course or not, I don't think it will make any difference Reply

Phoenixflame

Posted by: Phoenixflame
Posted: 18th Nov 2015

Phoenixflame says: Yes agreed. Complementary to this, there should be an 'older driver's course' to ensure older drivers are still safe and knowlegable of current road rules Reply

Mich71

Posted by: Mich71
Posted: 23rd Sep 2016

Mich71 says: Yes I do agree with that Reply

col

Posted by: col
Posted: 17th Feb 2017

col says: defensive driving is something that is supposed to be taught by driving instructors naturally but a lot of instructors I have seen on the road should not be in the job. Defensive driving is not about getting out of trouble but not getting into trouble, such as, peripheral vision; be aware of where vehicles are around you and see vehicles at intersections and corners as you approach: read conditions ahead such as seeing 2 cars ahead when brake lights come on so you are ready: slow down when you see orange ahead and do not wait until you are nearly there before braking: you must think of what other drivers may do. I have had a drivers licence for 60 years and raced motor vehicles for 25 years so believe me. Reply

helen30692411

Posted by: helen30692411
Posted: 20th Jun 2017

helen30692411 says: I'm going to fence sit here. Yes totally agree, this could help with the road toll. Also just wondered if this course would encourage the teens to practice their Defensive Driving on the main road and be aggressive.....
Hubby and I travelled on a winding mountain on sunday afternoon, and through the drive a young driver caught up with us, had a RED Provisional licence, and was sitting on our bum.....we stopped and allowed him to pass, and he absolutely flew around the rest of the corners and was gone....I half expected to see the car wrapped around a tree... Reply

dlrmatrix

Posted by: dlrmatrix
Posted: 8th Jul 2017

dlrmatrix says: yes i agree and also roundabout rules ! Reply

socker

Posted by: socker
Posted: 20th Jul 2017

socker says: My company paid for all to attend a defensive driving course skid pan and all. Great day out much better than working didn't do much for the driving skills though more a need of a physiology assessment of all drivers to reduce road rage Reply

Gordo

Posted by: Gordo
Posted: 22nd Jul 2017

Gordo says: Like the old school style "Put marked Police cars at strategic locations, at the side of the road. INSTANTLY every driver (ahem) behaves. I did my defensive driving course as part of training for a driving job. Never regretted it and still have an almost accident free record. Can't control Skippy or winds (in a van) that literally blew me off the road. Bullbars are wonderful . . . . Reply

Goulah

Posted by: Goulah
Posted: 21st Dec 2017

Goulah says: The defensive driving course should be part of the licence gaining process. No course, no licence. Reply

A_3_headed_monkey

Posted by: A_3_headed_monkey
Posted: 31st Dec 2017

A_3_headed_monkey says: Yes, i think all drivers should be required to learn some defensive driving skills to use in an emergency. But i would also worry that this might embolden some immature drivers with new skills to be even more reckless.

I would also like to see all drivers go through some type of refresher every 10years. Road rules change, some things are forgotten. Some people pass their initial test but perhaps shouldn't have. Reply

PGS

Posted by: PGS
Posted: 4th Jan 2018

PGS says: I agree the defensive driving class should be done, but we, the ever generous taxpayers, shouldn't have to cover it through taxes. You pay to do your driving class/course/test, this should be no different.

Equally important is that all driving tests should be done in English only. I can't do the test in China or Thailand in English, it has to be in their language, it should be no different here.

Regardless of what some who failed test think, it is not discrimination to be failed if you are not good enough. (Friend is a driving examiner)
Reply

Jenny31376507

Posted by: Jenny31376507
Posted: 25th Jan 2018

Jenny31376507 says: Oh wow this sounds like a good idea Reply

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